International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences http://journal.intlmedbio.com/index.php/IJMBS <p><strong>ABOUT</strong></p> <p>International Journal of Medicine &amp; Biomedical Sciences (IJMBioS) is an open access, peer-reviewed, quarterly published journal that encompasses all fundamental and molecular aspects of medical and biomedical sciences. It publishes original research papers, review papers, case studies, short communications, letter to the editors in all novel and innovative aspects of health, disease and environment encompassing medicine and biomedical sciences. </p> <p>We aim to bring relevant findings and message that advances our understanding of medical and biomedical sciences to a wide international audience using health, disease and techniques interrelated with it.</p> <p>The following areas are covered in the Journal:</p> <p>&gt; Molecular Biology &gt; Bioinformatics &gt; Integrative Medicine <br />&gt; Microbiology &gt; Biochemistry &gt; Internal Medicine<br />&gt; Biotechnology &gt; Biologics &gt; Herbal Medicine<br />&gt; Health and Disease &gt; Pharmacy &gt; Occupational Health<br />&gt; Epidemiology &gt; Nursing &gt; Treatment Protocols </p> <p>Scientific contributions from relevant Researchers, Clinical Practitioners, Health Professionals and Research Students under ethical and journal guidelines are appreciated. The major objective of this publication is to promote/ advance science through encouraging the researchers to publish and make the scientific information available to all in the most easily accessible form.</p> Society of Life Sciences Nepal en-US International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences 2594-3499 <p>IJMBioS follows the following Terms and License of the manuscript under <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/deed.en_GB">Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)</a> where Author and Journal are can Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material, and it is Non-Commercial. </p> Pleural Fluid Bilirubin to Serum Bilirubin Ratio, comparison with Light’s Criteria. http://journal.intlmedbio.com/index.php/IJMBS/article/view/34 <p><strong>Introduction: </strong>Pleural fluid bilirubin and pleural fluid bilirubin to serum bilirubin ratio evaluation had been reported by several in distinguishing exudative from transudative pleural effusions along with Light’s Criteria. The aim of this study was to assess whether pleural fluid bilirubin to serum bilirubin ratio, was a sensitive marker in classifying the pleural effusion as exudative and transudative and its correlation with Light’s criteria.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A cross-sectional, observational study of Pleural fluid bilirubin to serum bilirubin ratio ≥ 0.6 for exudates was taken and compared with Light’s criteria overall and its individual parameters to classify exudative and transudative along with the diagnosis. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 16, Sensitivity, specificity, Positive predictive value (PPV), Negative predictive value (NPV) and diagnostic accuracy of each tests were calculated.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>By diagnosis on discharge out of 86 samples of pleural effusion, 78(90.69%) were exudative and 8(9.3%) were transudative effusion. Among transudative effusion, 72 were classified correctly and 6 were misclassified by pleural fluid Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) &gt; 2/3<sup>rd</sup> of serum LDH criteria and out of 8 transudative, 4 were misclassified as exudative. When the pleural fluid to serum bilirubin ratio ≥0.6 was used to differentiate , it categorized 67 as exudative effusion by pleural fluid LDH &gt; 2/3<sup>rd</sup> of serum LDH criteria and 11 were misclassified as transudative. This criterion had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 85.53%, 50%, 92.88% and 27.78 % respectively with a significant p value of &lt;0.01.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The pleural fluid to serum bilirubin ratio can serve as an alternative easy and cost-effective diagnostic tool in differentiating between exudative and transudative pleural effusion. Though, it misclassified 11 exudative pleural fluids as transudative and 4 transudative as exudative. By taking Light’s criteria as a standard, pleural fluid <em>bilirubin</em> to serum bilirubin ratio ≥0.6 was found to be inferior to the Light’s criteria also in terms of sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV. Still the pleural fluid to serum bilirubin ratio can serve as an alternative easy and cost-effective diagnostic tool in differentiating between exudative and transudative pleural effusion in low resource settings.</p> Manoj Kumar Yadav Anusmriti Pal Anjal Bisht Jiwan Thapa Copyright (c) 2021 Manoj Kumar Yadav, Anusmriti Pal, Anjal Bisht, Jiwan Thapa https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-11-16 2021-11-16 5 1